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Buy a pair of cheap boots (I recommend red ones with little ladybug antennae) and when you come to the point where you have to use them, buy your fancy boots? Your feet will be dry in between fancy boots and you can keep your ladybug boots in the back of the closet to be your bridge pair in the future.

easy solution: take extra good care of your boots, have them re-soled every year, oil them, and enjoy how comfortable they become with age.

cheap ladybug boots are also a good solution, but my problem with them is that they leak. that's $20 down the drain. my first world solution was to pay too much for a pair of reliable aigle rain boots.

When I'm resisting a practical but expensive purchase, I reframe how I think about the cost. I think of the (initial lump-sum) cost not as $XXX, but as $X/day over the course of the object's lifetime.

You aren't likely to use the new boots just once or twice, or even once a week, but every other day (switching off pairs daily to give them a rest and, in rainy seasons, let them dry well).

Not only does that bring the lifetime cost of the desired new boots to dollars (or even cents) a day, but by buying a second pair, you decrease the daily cost and increase the useful life of both pairs.

It's actually the most frugal path if you can afford it. There. That was easy.

Elsa knows whereof she speaks. The trick is to have the money to lay out in the first place. Another reason why the rich get richer, and etc., I suppose. And those are some really nice boots.

Elsa speaks my language! Well, of course, all of you do, but she has the direct line to my greedy/frugal heart.

They're my all purpose work shoe, on top of keeping my feet dry in the rain, so ladybug boots wouldn't sub in very well, adorable though they are. I do oil them and resole them lovingly, but it seems that I walk too hard, as I wear through the heel taps in much less than a year. It doesn't feel like I grind my feet into the ground with every step, but my cobbler might beg to differ.

Hi - my first comment here ... Perhaps you need to expand your catalogue horizons - in the hunting and generally outdoorsy world you can purchase boot dryers. I imagine you put on toasty and dry shoes every day using these lovely gadgets...

Of course, my reasoning only works when one can afford the initial outlay, which is why boots are a ready metaphor for the brutal and constantly compounding trap of poverty, from H.G. Wells to Terry Pratchett.

Your boots may not be rested, but at least they're watered. Maybe they could be curried, too.

Suze: I had no idea, and yet, now that you say it, it seems obvious that someone must have invented such a thing. How luxurious (but in a clever way that one might conceivably pass off as simple sensible practicality - I think the hunting world is often very cunning in this way)! Are there sock-warmers to go with them?

Murr Brewster: Mmm, curried boots.

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redfox is a small furry animal, but unfortunately not the sweet and adorable kind. she lives in an awfully large house with her black-bearded husband snarkout and marauding child jane.

see also: the hungry tiger

Dinner reports

More dinners.

Things I Cried Over

  • The Great British Sewing Bee.

  • Window washers.

  • Lilo and Stitch. Repeatedly.

  • "No one was with her when she died."

  • Slings and Arrows.
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